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Leaping Dragon

Leaping crocodile

This month's picture was taken by Erin Britton. Yes, I was very tempted to call it "Leaping Lizard" but frankly this is no lizard! The photograph was taken on the Adelaide River in the Northern Territory of Australia, not too far from Darwin. Here, several tour operators run "jumping crocodile" cruises, where visitors can not only see a slice of NT wildlife, they also get to see saltwater crocodiles large and small "leaping" for small pieces of meat. This particular one was taken on the Spectacular Jumping Crocodile Cruise, though there are others.

This particular crocodile is one of the larger ones found in the Adelaide River, perhaps close to 5 metres in length. In fact, there are more large crocodiles in this river than there have been for over half a century given how well they have recovered since hunting ceased in 1971. There are, as always, rumours of even larger ones. But this one shows just how easily it can push its massive bulk vertically into the air to grab food. Crocodiles normally do this to get their jaws around food that is otherwise just out of reach, and you'd be surprised just what lengths they'll go to for a bite to eat.

Would you like to enter your best photograph as a potential Pic of the Month? Send it to me and I'll include the best here each month. Each year I run a competition where the best photograph each year is awarded a prize. To be in contention the picture must, above all, capture your attention.


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