PIC OF THE MONTH


Crocodilian images which reveal fascinating stories told from a visual perspective.



CSL
CROCODILIAN SPECIES LIST


CSL
BIOLOGY DATABASE


CCOM
COMMUNICATION


LINKS
INTERNET LINKS


CROCFAQ
CAPTIVE CARE

 
ARCHIVE:
1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003

JAN 99 | FEB 99 | MAR 99 | APR 99 | MAY 99 | JUN 99
JUL 99 | AUG 99 | SEP 99 | OCT 99 | NOV 99 | DEC 99


Laying the Next Generation

Egg laying

Well this picture certainly isn't going to be winning any awards (it was taken at night), but I thought you'd like to see the start of new life here at Crocodylus Park in the Northern Territory of Australia. This is an adult female crocodile, about 3 metres in length, laying eggs into her nest. Saltwater crocodiles (C. porosus) construct a mound nest out of suitable vegetation such as broad-leaf grasses, bits of twigs and mud. Here, our captive female is using straw placed into her enclosure. She scratches up a nest over three nights (females salties quite often take a bit of time over the nest) and finally digs a deep chamber into the top of the nest using her hind feet. She then positions herself over the chamber and starts the laying process. During this time, she becomes very placid, although still aware of what's going on around her. Each egg is laid every 30 seconds to 2 minutes, and the whole process can take around 4 5 minutes to an hour depending on the number of eggs. Females tend to lay 40 to 60 eggs in the wild on average. This one laid 35 - a fairly small clutch. Then she spends up to an hour slowly packing the nesting material over the eggs - using just her hind legs to move the straw and press it down. In captivity, the eggs are collected the next day and incubated under controlled conditions. They take around 2.5 months to hatch.


SPECIES LIST | BIOLOGY DATABASE | COMMUNICATION | CAPTIVE CARE
CROCS ON FILM | CROC SHOTS | CHINESE ALLIGATOR FUND | CROC LINKS


Return to Crocodilians Natural History & Conservation
Design and content by Adam Britton © 1995-2012 All rights reserved. [email]